If our parents, who have nurtured us, held our hand and taught us how to walk are ever in need of help, will we step away from the privilege to offer assistance?

If our parents, who have nurtured us, held our hand and taught us how to walk are ever in need of help, will we step away from the privilege to offer assistance? Unfortunately we see people taking all the benefit from Yoga, Vedanta etc., but step away from the responsibility of alleviating the concerns of the Hindu society, that has offered these gems in the first place? Is it not ingratitude to turn the other way absolving oneself of this duty? I have witnessed , among a growing number of people (students and teachers alike) this careless, callous attitude- both in India and the West (but more so in the latter).

They reap all that our Vedas have to offer but show little to no inclination to contribute to sustain these teachings and value systems. Worse, a separation is created between the identity of a ‘student of Vedanta’ vs that of a ‘Hindu’. They further claim they are far removed from Indian society and hence cannot make a meaningful contribution. Though this is untrue, I would ask, where do these guys disappear when the teachings they seem to hold sacred are distorted in Western Academia? Where were their protests when the Aghoris were being demonized by CNN? Where were their voices when our school textbooks (such as the case in California) maligned Hindus? In short, though there is/was ample opportunity to lend a helping hand even in the West, why no contribution? This attitude of “give me the goodies, but you keep the problems”, is it not selfish? Is this any better than a child only associating with one’s parents to receive their love, but pushing their share of responsibility of looking after them onto the other siblings? We consider it a blessing to serve the cause of dharma, and do not see it as a burden, nonetheless these questions should not be left unanswered by one’s conscience.

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